Archives for posts with tag: conference room
Evolution Final.jpg

The evolution of HON’s Ignition seating line

History hasn’t been revealing in who invented the first chair, but it was likely back in the Neolithic Period. Stone tools allowed our ancestors to take some of the first steps towards developing furniture by chiseling away a bench out of a larger rock.

Chair Blog 1

A modern interpretation of the klismos chair. Photo credit: 1stdibs.com.

Around the time of the Egyptian pharaohs, chairs were status symbols. Common folk sat on stools while those of royalty or elite status sat in chairs with backs and arms. From the inception of the words chair and throne, there has seemingly been a difference. Chair can be traced back to the Greeks and means ‘to sit down’, whereas throne comes from an Indo-European base for ‘hold’ or ‘support’ (Jewell & Abate, 2001). As has been interpreted, the discrepancy in the two meanings shows how chairs are for anyone to sit in while the throne supported the elite.

In the 5th century B.C., the Greeks invented one of the most depicted chairs in all of antiquity, the klismos chair. The light-weight chair with curved legs is seen on many painted pieces of pottery, stone carvings, and other artworks. While elegant, without further structural support the legs can spread apart and eventually crack or break when someone sits down on the seat (Crantz, 1998).

Chair Blog 2

The throne of King Louis XIV of France. Public domain.

After a period of relative stagnation, chairs and thrones resumed their larger role in society in the Renaissance. They became refined, highly decorated, and comfortable. These places to sit became pieces of art, adorned with gold, silver, and precious stones (de Dampierre, 2006). Different types of chairs were starting to be widely used. Those who could afford them now had separate dining chairs, side chairs, armchairs, and other specific-use seating.

Today, as our lives become less about threshing and more about checking email, there are seating styles that are more practical and ergonomic for our hours in front of a computer. The classic task chairs are now designed to be comfortable and adjustable in a multitude of ways. There are different options for perching, for learning, and sitting at conference tables.

Chair Blog 3

The HON Ignition 2.0 task chair is an example of 21st century functionality. It provides a breathable mesh back, adjustable arms, lumbar support, and a synchronized tilt that allows the user to adjust the chair to meet his or her needs.

The rest of this post is a quote from Witold Rybczynski, the author of Now I Sit Me Down. It shows how a difference in seating habits can result in a wide variety of cultural norms.

“If you sit on floor mats, you are likely to develop an etiquette that requires removing footwear before entering the home. You are also more likely to wear sandals or slippers rather than laced-up shoes, and loose clothing that enables you to squat or sit cross-legged. Floor-sitters tend not to use tall wardrobes—it is more convenient to store things in chests and low cabinets closer to floor level. People who sit on mats are more likely to sleep on mats, too, just as chair-sitters are more likely to sleep in beds. Chair-sitting societies develop a variety of furniture such as dining tables, dressing tables, coffee tables, desks, and sideboards. Sitting on the floor also affects architecture: walking around the house in bare feet or socks demands smooth floors—no splinters—preferably warm wood rather than stone; places to sit are likely to be covered with soft mats or woven carpets; tall windowsills and very tall ceilings hold less appeal. Lastly, posture has direct physical effects. A lifetime of sitting unsupported on the floor develops muscles not required for chair-sitting, which is why chair-sitters, unaccustomed to sitting cross-legged, soon become uncomfortable in that position. And vice versa.” 

As you can see, humans have had a long history with the chair. From chiseled benches and wood-carved stools to task seating with ergonomic designs, we have come a long way.

Make sure that you aren’t left in the stone age and check out the new HON seating options at hon.com.

References

Crantz, G. (1998). The Chair: Rethinking Culture, Body, and Design. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

de Dampierre, F. (2006). Chairs: A History. New York: Abrams.

Friedman, U. (2016, August 30). A Global History of Sitting Down. Retrieved from The Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/08/chairs-history-witold-rybczynski/497657/

Jewell, E. J., & Abate, F. (2001). The New Oxford American Dictionary. New York: Oxford University Press.

Rybczynski, W. (2016). Now I sit me down: from klismos to plastic chair: a natural history. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

 

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Preside, a holistic table solution to fit your space and design aesthetic, just keeps getting better. Whether it’s used as a stand-alone solution or matched with existing HON desk lines, Preside was designed to adapt to the needs of any space, outfitting all areas: conference, meeting, café and commons, collaborative, engaging spaces and more. With so much to offer, what more could HON add? Well, this week we’re introducing three key enhancements that will make Preside an even more versatile solution.

1. From Conference Room to Collaborative Space
The Preside expansion addresses growing workplace trends with new collaborative table solutions. These new tables help bring people together and offer a clean, modern design. Available in 72” or 96” lengths, select from seated- or standing-height.  Like the rest of the Preside line, these tables are available with or without technology. Choose between a full or half modesty panel, or a stretcher beam and no modesty panel when powered. Even more reason to love these new collaborative tables, the modesty panels can now be specified in the same laminate as the top or a coordinating laminate for a dual finish look!

Preside is moving out of the conference room and into collaborative spaces

2. Power Up with More Technology Options
Everyone is plugged in and on the go, so quick and easy access to power is important in both the conference and collaborative spaces. Preside has always had power options, but our recent additions provide more flexibility. New Extron plates offer more data options such as DP, VGA, HDMI and USB. These plates fit into the existing flip-top ports making it easy to swap out when power/media needs change, creating a future-proof way to power up Preside tables. Staying connected is something to get excited about!

New Extron plates allow for more power options

3. Build-Your-Own Perfect Space
New credenza options make it easy to create just the right solution for any space.  The Preside hospitality credenza was revamped last year to add great features, like hidden drawers and ventilation for a mini-fridge. While these great options are still available, the recent expansion includes a smaller, 60” buffet credenza (also with ventilation) and new modular credenza components. The new modular models allow you to choose from a bookshelf with a door unit, an open bookshelf, or a box drawer and door unit. The units can be mixed and matched to create just the right credenza for any space. Units can then share a spanning top and a spanning back for a finished and custom look. Sizable, custom looking credenzas- who wouldn’t get excited?

New storage options and build-your-own credenzas allow users to create just the right space

Preside has always been an exciting solution, but these new expansions reinvigorate our excitement for this popular collaborative solution. Which new enhancement are you most excited about?

Leveraging fabrics and finishes across product platforms not only makes specifying easier, but also adds to versatility. Just as you shouldn’t have to limit yourself on color options, don’t limit yourself to the same standard desk configuration – get creative! Below are 5 less common, yet practical applications for HON product in the workplace.

Voi® Credenzas as ancillary seating and media storage

Voi

Try placing Voi credenzas in a meeting area to serve as ancillary seating and additional storage space. The layered height allows people to casually join the conversation, while the cabinets hide any office and media supplies.

Purpose® as “huddle room” seating

Purpose

“Huddle Rooms” are smaller conference areas designed for teamwork and productivity. Purpose’s light scale design and intuitive adjustments provide comfort without overpowering these smaller rooms.

Flock® as café “booth” seating

Flock

Frequently used in welcoming and reception areas, it’s easy to forget how versatile Flock is. Integrate the modular armless chair into a café area to create booth-style seating as pictured above, or just a softer area to encourage conversation and  collaboration. It might be a good idea to upholster in a durable fabric like Momentum’s Silica (now standard HON Grade VIII).

Endorse task stool with Flock personal table

Endorse

Provide extra seating in a training room with the Endorse task stool and Flock personal table. This is a great area for presenters to sit before taking the front of the room, or an area for late-comers to sneak into without disrupting the entire training/meeting.

Flock ottomans as ancillary seating in a conference room

Flock

Anytime a conference room has more people than chairs, count on the meeting starting late because everyone is plucking a chair from the nearest area to drag in. Add Flock ottomans to the corner or along the wall to provide additional seating and interest to an otherwise “dead space”.

What are some other unique or nontraditional ways you use HON products?

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